Martin Hunt's Website
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Computer Programming

I write programs that draw images based on simulations of physical processes. Right now, I'm working on a simulation of the electromagnetic field. Most of the images on my site grew out of that research.

The kind of programming I do isn't particularly difficult.
Programming itself isn't difficult. Here - let me program you, and show you how it's done.

I like computer programming. I got my first computer so that I could write programs. I've worked with many languages. I find that interpretted languages are best for my work, and the best I've found by far is Euphoria by RDS Software. Euphoria has many advantages. It's easy to learn and very powerful. It has a data structure called "sequences" that is so very ingenious and flexible. There is an excellent mailing list associated with it that links a community from all over the world that is actively developing the language and gives support to new users. My friend Buddy, who lives somewhere on the other side of the glass on my monitor, has started a Webring. Click on his webring button and see some other Euphoria related sites.

Copyright 2000, Martin Hunt
Webmaster ; Martin Hunt
Revised; 03/03/00

Buddy's Website
Buddy's Site






Artificial Non-Intelligence Experiment

Here's your chance to try out being a computer. I call it an artificial non-intelligence, because you are intelligent, and here's a chance to behave like you're not.
  • Perform all the instructions, one after the other
    • Let X = 1
    • This is the start of the X LOOP - remember where it is
      • Print the value of X with your pencil on a piece of paper
      • Increase the value of X by adding 1 to it.
      • If X is less than 11 then please go to start of the X LOOP
      • If you get to here you're done
Not so hard to understand. But you can see that that short program would involve you in a lot of work if we re-wrote it with a tiny change.
  • Perform all the instructions, one after the other
    • Let X = 1
    • This is the start of the x loop - remember where it is
      • Print the value of X with your pencil on a piece of paper
      • Increase the value of X by adding 1 to it.
      • If X is less than 1000000000 then please go to start of the X loop
      • If you get to here you're done
You'd get bored. You'd run out of paper. You'd get a computer.

But things get a little more interesting if we add another loop to the program (did you find the first one?), like this:

  • Perform all the instructions, one after the other
    • Let X = 1
    • This is the start of the X LOOP- remember where it is
      • Let Y = 0
      • This is the start of the Y LOOP - remember where it is
        • Print the value of X+Y with your pencil on a piece of paper
        • Increase the value of Y by adding 1 to it.
        • If Y is less than 10 then please go to start of the Y LOOP
    • Increase the value of X by adding 1 to it.
    • If X is less than 11 then please go to start of the X LOOP
  • If you get to here you're done

This is what you would have produced in the first program (if you were a really neat printer)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

I won't bore you with the output of the second program, and below is what the output of the third program would be like.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19